2015-12-09 / Front Page

CAMPUS TO CAMPUS

Burke County High School is offering college courses
By Madison Bearden
True Citizen Intern


Burke County High School student Corey Milton discusses literature with Augusta Technical College instructor Terri Degenhardt. Corey is one of 30 BCHS students enrolled in college-level courses. Burke County High School student Corey Milton discusses literature with Augusta Technical College instructor Terri Degenhardt. Corey is one of 30 BCHS students enrolled in college-level courses. Students are now earning college credit while they attend classes at Burke County High School.

Through the “Move on When Ready” (MOWR) initiative, BCHS has partnered with Augusta Technical College to provide dual enrollment courses. Since

August, ATC professor Terri Degenhardt and BCHS instructor Adrianne Griffith have been teaching English 1101 and College Algebra, respectively, during first period at the high school. The on-site courses have allowed students to completely bypass transportation and scheduling problems that accompany typical dual enrollment programs that are taught on college campuses.

BCHS principal Sam Adkins believes the new partnership has opened up a whole new channel of opportunity for high achieving students at his school.

“We are extremely pleased with the partnership we have developed with Augusta Tech to build our dual enrollment program at BCHS. It’s the best of both worlds for our students. They remain on our campus, take articulated college courses, and earn college and high school credit,” he said. “With the ever increasing cost of a college education, dual enrollment has financial benefits, such as tuition and books are free as part of MOWR.”

“I fully support dual enrollment opportunities and our plans are to expand course offerings in both the degree and diploma programs,” he added. “Our expansion also entails more of our current faculty, like Mrs. Griffith, assuming the teaching responsibilities of the courses.” With three full months of the new program under the school’s belt, Secondary Curriculum Director LaToscha Evans likes the purposeful direction she has watched to students set off on.

“We are excited about collaborating with colleges to offer this opportunity,” she said.

Q&A

CALEEB ROBERSON, BCHS SENIOR

How has your college experience been so far?

I’m not going to say it is easy. It is challenging, but beneficial.

How does it compare to traditional high school?

With our regular classes, we have a variety of students and the teacher has to make sure each student understands … so it can be slow. With a college class, everything is fast-paced and a lot is crammed in a short period of time. They also are very strict on errors … and no re-dos; whereas in our regular classes, the teachers are more lenient and might not take off points.

Is it more difficult?

It is, but you have to work around it. The grading is way different. You have to put in a good amount of effort. They expect a lot from you.


Senior David Hickman attends GSU on campus while simultaneously earning high school credit. Senior David Hickman attends GSU on campus while simultaneously earning high school credit. With school, sports and your job at Bi-Lo, how is this preparing you for college?

It gives me the mindset of the college lifestyle. It’s putting me a step ahead of kids who don’t take college classes.

Goal for the season?

The goal for this season is to place in the top three bands in all five of the competitions we will compete in this year.

Q&A

AMANDA DURANT, BCHS JUNIOR

Why did you decide to take college classes your junior year?

I really wanted a challenge and it sounded cool. It’s convenient and I didn’t have to pay anything. I’m also getting high school and college credit.

What is the difference between high school and college classes?

With our regular classes, we have a variety of students and the The college classes are a lot more challenging and more work. We cram more math or English into two days of college classes than we would in five days of a high school class.

Will you be better prepared when you leave for college?

I’m most definitely learning to take on more responsibility.

Will you take more college courses your senior year?

Yes, then I will have a full year of English and math credits when I leave for college.

MOVING TO COLLEGE

Not all Burke County students are taking college courses with their classmates.

Senior David Hickman is one of two BCHS students who used the Move On When Ready program to enroll in a real campus experience.

He decided to completely reroute his final year at Burke County High School to a collegiate adventure as a freshman at Georgia Southern University.

While he earns his first year of college credits in Statesboro, he will be simultaneously earning the high school credits he needs for a diploma.

Studying Food Nutrition Science with an emphasis on dietetics, David has embraced the college atmosphere.

“I love the college environment. The classes are more interesting than high school,” he said, “It is harder than high school, but easier to manage classes. In high school, you have seven classes to manage, but in college you may have as little as four.” For

David, it’s a win-win.“I left home early because the program was too good to pass up,” he said, noting that while he will graduate with high school classmates this May, he should actually finish college a year early, at the age of 21.

While he acknowledges it will take hard work to stay on track, he credits the educators back home with giving him a solid foundation.

“I had amazing teachers in high school who prepared me for college,” David said. “High school really does prepare you for college if you pay attention.”

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